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Violet Sting Ray (DASIATIS VIOLACEA)

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RAY, VIOLET STING / DASIATIS VIOLACEA
2 4 5.7 12.9 Monaco France 200802 P. Sebile
4 8 4.2 9.4 Monaco France 160802 P. Sebile
10 20 6.20 13.11 Corse France 080601 P. Sebile
AT AT 6.20 13.11 Corse France 080601 P. Sebile

The violet sting ray (DASIATIS VIOLACEA)

or pelagic stingray is distributed worldwide in tropical to temperate waters between 50°N - 50°S latitudes. It has been reported in the Mediterranean and off Cape Verde in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. In the eastern Pacific Ocean it has been documented in the waters of Hawaii, Canada, California, Mexico, Chile, and the Galapagos Islands. Other reports include off the coasts of western and southern Africa and southern Japan as well as Tasmania and Australia and numerous others.

In contrast to other rays, the pelagic stingray is found in open ocean waters and inshore bays rather than buried in sandy bottom shallow waters. Usually found in the top 330 feet (100 m) over deep water, this ray has been reported to depths of 780 feet (238 m). It swims by the undulation of the pectoral fins which is typical of stingrays.

violet sting ray (DASIATIS VIOLACEA)

The pelagic stingray has a broad wedge-shaped disc which is wider than long. The snout is broadly rounded with the presence of a terminal lobe. The small eyes do not protrude from the body as in other rays. The tail measures up to double the length of the body with a long lower caudal finfold that terminates in front of the tip of the tail. There is no upper finfold present on the pelagic stingray. The front margin of the pelvic fin is straight while the outer corner is broadly rounded. The tail has a thick base, tapering to the origin of the serrated spine. There is one or more venomous spines located about a third of the way down the tail which are used for defense.

The dorsal surface of the pelagic stingray is dark purple or blue-green while the underside is purplish to gray. There are no distinguishing markings. This makes it difficult for predators to see this ray from above since the dark coloration blends the ray with the dark ocean waters below.

The pelagic stingray is a relatively small ray reaching a maximum size of 31.5 inches (80 cm) disc width and 63 inches (160 cm) total length. In captivity, females may reach much larger sizes, measuring up to 39 inches (100 cm) disc width and weighing around 110 pounds (50 kg). Male pelagic stingrays reach sexual maturity at 13-16 inches (35-40 cm) disc width and females at 16-20 inches (40-50 cm) disc width.

Information supplied by http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu

 
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