EFSA - European Federation of Sea Anglers
The Official Site for The European Federation of Sea Anglers
 
EFSA - European Federation Of Sea Anglers

Triggerfish (BALISTES CAROLINENSIS)

Line
Class
kgs
Line
Class
lbs
Weight
in
kgs
Weight
in
lbs. ozs
Place
of
capture
Country
of
capture
Date
of
capture
Name
of
angler
     
TRIGGER FISH / BALISTES CAROLINENSIS
2 4 1.3 2.14 Arcachon France 280702 P. Sebile
4 8 1.83 4.0 Detached Mole Gibraltar 071095 P. Dunham
6 12 2.54 5.9 Santa Maria Azores 190996 H. Damerius
8 16 1.82 4.0 San Miguel Azores 140788 P. Febo
*AT AT 2.67 5.14 Lynmouth England 95 K. Lydiard
*SH SH 2.67 5.14 Lynmouth England 95 K. Lydiard

The Triggerfish (BALISTES CAROLINENSIS)

occurs in the western Atlantic Ocean from Nova Scotia (Canada), southeast to Bermuda, and south to Argentina, as well as in the Gulf of Mexico. It is common in the coastal waters of Florida. The Triggerfish also found in the eastern Atlantic Ocean from England and Ireland, south to Angola, and in the Mediterranean Sea.

Preferring hard bottoms, reefs, and ledges, the Triggerfish is abundant in nearshore and offshore locations. This fish inhabits bays, lagoons, and seaward reefs to depths of 180 feet (55 m). The adults drift along the bottom either alone or in small groups, while the juveniles drift at the surface with sargassum.

The Triggerfish (BALISTES CAROLINENSIS) - European Federation of Sea Angling
© David Snyder

As a diurnal predator, the Triggerfish feeds primarily on benthic invertebrates such as shrimp, crabs, sea urchins, sand dollars, sea stars, sea cucumbers, and bivalve mollusks. During one study, Triggerfish were observed displaying an interesting feeding behavior. They moved away from their reef home, out over sand, and assumed a vertical position a few inches above the bottom. The fish directed a stream of water at the sand with enough force to reveal sand dollars living below the surface. If none were present, the fish moved about three feet away and continued this behavior. When the Triggerfish was successful at exposing a sand dollar, it repeated the blowing action, further exposing the prey. Next, the Triggerfish darted in, grabbing the sand dollar with its beak-like teeth, lifting it above the bottom and dropping it. This process was repeated until the sand dollar landed upside down. This was followed by the Triggerfish assuming a vertical position over the sand dollar, and with jaws closed, thrusting downward, crushing the center. The fish then ate the soft inside tissues of the sand dollar. Triggerfish also locate and eat sea urchins in a similar manner. Juvenile Triggerfish associated with sargassum communities feed on algae, hydroids, barnacles, and polychaetes.

Information supplied by www.flmnh.ufl.edu

 
European Federation of Sea Anglers - EFSA - Resources