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Little Tuna (EUTHYNNUS ALLETTERATUS)

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TUNA, LITTLE / EUTHYNNUS ALLETTERATUS
4 8 11.50 25.6 Porto Barricata Italy 121105 S. Bersanetti
6 12 9.96 21.15 Marina Di Ravenna Italy 030799 T. Melandri
8 16 11.37 25.1 Porto Barricata Italy 110904 S. Bersanetti
10 20 16.50 36.6 Albarella Italy 130799 M. Vittadello
15 30 10.07 22.3 Porto Empedocle Italy 021102 R. Scalzo
AT AT 16.50 36.6 Albarella Italy 130799 M. Vittadello

The Little Tuna (EUTHYNNUS ALLETTERATUS)

is found worldwide in tropical to temperate waters, between 56°N-30°S. In the western Atlantic Ocean, it ranges from Massachusetts (US), south to Brazil, including the Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean Sea, and Bermuda. It is the most common scombrid in the western north Atlantic. Other locations include the Mediterranean Sea and the Black Sea.

This fish is typically found in neritic waters, inshore over the continental shelf in turbid, brackish waters. Adult little tuna school according to size with other scombrid species at depths ranging from 3-490 feet (1-150m). However, during certain times of the year the schools break apart with individuals scattering throughout the habitat. Juveniles form compact schools offshore.

The little tuna has a robust, torpedo-shaped body built for powerful swimming. The mouth is large, slightly curved, and terminal with rigid jaws. The lower jaw slightly protruding past the upper jaw. There are two longitudinal ridges on the tongue. Scales are lacking on the body except for the corselet and the lateral line. The corselet is a band of large, thick scales forming a circle around the body behind the head, extending backwards along the lateral line. The lateral line is slightly undulate with a slight arch below the front of the dorsal fin, then straight to the caudal keel. The caudal fin is deeply lunate, with a slender caudal penduncle including one short keel on each side. The first dorsal fin has high anterior spines giving the fin a concave outline, separated only narrowly from the second dorsal. Pectoral fins are pointed and short, not reaching to the end of the first dorsal; the pelvic fins are inserted just behind the origin of the pectoral fins. Swimbladder is absent.
Little Tuna (EUTHYNNUS ALLETTERATUS) - European Federation of Sea Angling

The flesh of the little tuna is darker and stronger tasting than that of the other large tunas. It is marketed fresh, dried, canned, smoked, and frozen. There have been reports of ciguatera poisoning related to human consumption of this fish. It is often caught on hook and line by trolling with lures near reefs. Also it is considered an excellent game fish due to their hard fighting ability once hooked. The little tuna is frequently used as a bait for shark and marlin fisheries, primarily due to their high oil content and good hook retention.

Information supplied by www.flmnh.ufl.edu

 
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