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skipjack tuna (EUTHYNNUS PELAMIS)

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TUNA, SKIP JACK / EUTHYNNUS PELAMIS
4 8 6.05 13.5 Puerto Rico Canary Is. 180188 M. Bartels
6 12 10.50 23.2 Catania Italy 211009 M.Brogna
8 16 6.60 14.9 Puerto Rico Canary Is. 230896  H. Damerius
10 20 17.00 37.08 Catania Italy 211009 P. Bottino
15 30 7.05 15.9 Catania Italy 111099 G. Barbagallo
24 50 5.00 11.0 Faial Azores 251190 A. Bolton
37 80 17.00 37.8 Puerto Rico Canary Is. 021195 H. Lehmkuhl
AT AT 17.00 37.8 Puerto Rico Canary Is. 021195 H. Lehmkuhl
        Catania Italy 211009 P.Bottino

The skipjack tuna (Euthynnus Pelamis)

was first described in 1758 by Carl Linnaeus, who named it Scomber pelamis. There is still much debate about the generic placement of the skipjack, some prefer to group it with other members of the genus Euthynnus, while others recommend it be placed in its own genus, Katsuwonus.

The species name pelamis is derived from Latin, meaning "tunny". Other names which have been used to refer to this tuna include Scomber pelamides Lacepede 1880, Scomber pelamys Bloch and Synder 1801, Thynnus pelamys Cuvier 1817, Thynnus vagans Lesson 1826, Orcynus pelamy Poey 1875, and Gymnosarda pelamis Dresslar and Fesler 1889.

Skipjack tuna are distributed circumtropically. Additionally, they are present along the oceanic coast of Europe and throughout the North Sea, but are absent from the Mediterranean Sea and Black Seas.

Skipjack Tuna (EUTHYNNUS PELAMIS) - European Federation of Sea Angling

The skipjack tuna is an epipelagic fish, occurring in waters ranging in temperature from 58-86°F (14.7 to 30°C). While skipjacks remain at the surface during the day, they may descend to depths of 850 feet (260 m) at night. Skipjacks have a tendency to school, often under drifting objects or marine mammals. Skipjacks exhibit many types of schooling behavior, sometimes schooling with drifting objects, sharks, or whales.

They may swim slowly in circular paths or travel in a single direction. These schools may consist only of skipjack, or other tuna species may be present.

Skipjack often divide into schools based upon their size. This may be because the smaller fish cannot maintain the same top speeds of larger fish. Small fish may school while feeding, whereas larger fish (greater than 8 inches (20 cm)) tend to feed alone.

Information supplied by www.flmnh.ufl.edu

 
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